What Alice In Chains Guitarist Jerry Cantrell Loves About His Two Corvette Stingrays

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For rockstar Jerry Cantrell, owning a flashy sports car was a no-brainer. After spending years touring, songwriting, and shredding lead guitar for his band Alice and Chains, Cantrell figured the time had come to buy a vehicle to match his on-stage persona. So, in 1994, he put down $60,000 for a 1967 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray.

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“I’m not too much of a gear head, but it’s red with a black hood scoop, it’s got side pipes. I think it’s all matching numbers. There might be a couple of things I’ve added to it, but I kept the original parts,” explains Cantrell. “It came with a 427 Tri-Power, which I took out not to further damage and put a 454 in, so I can drive it around like a regular car. It’s just cool, it’s loud as f–k, it rumbles when you drive it, it smells of leather, oil, and gas. I don’t drive it that often, but I’ve maintained it throughout the years.”

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Just one year after buying the ’67 ‘Vette, Cantrelle decided that he wanted another one to match. So he went for the 1963 Sting Ray. Instead of a convertible, this one was a split-window coupe. “I grew up in the era of the astronauts, and a lot of those guys drove Corvettes. I was a big Speed Racer fan kid too, and that was a car that reminded me of the Mach Five,” says Cantrell.

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In Cantrell’s eyes, the ’63 is more refined and classy, while the ’67 has a need for speed. “The ’67 is like a sexy pig,” he explains. “It just rumbles and it’s so throaty, but it looks so good and it really just drips power, as well as looking amazing. But the ’63, I call it a little bit more refined, a little sleeker, doesn’t have the side pipes. It’s got a leather interior. The ’67 has a red, red on red. The ’63 is Ermine White on the outside with a saddle interior.”

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